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Bits Of Lego Keep Washing Up On Cornish Beaches

Whisky Galore!, but with bricks.

1. So. On 13 February 1997, the container ship Tokio Express was hit by a wave described by its captain as a “once-in-a-100-year phenomenon”.

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

 

2. It almost capsized the ship one way - then almost capsized it the other.

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

3. And that meant that 62 containers were lost overboard about a few dozen miles off Land’s End in Cornwall – and one of them was filled with around 5 million pieces of Lego, bound for New York.

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

 

4. The pieces are still washing up in Cornwall today – and have also apparently been found in Devon, Ireland, and Wales.

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

5. And – what are the chances? – many of the Lego items were nautical-themed. Loads of tiny cutlasses, flippers, and bits of scuba gear are appearing on the beaches.

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

6. Tracey Williams runs a Facebook page documenting the discoveries.

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

7. She recently got an email from someone in Melbourne claiming to have found a flipper from the spill.

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

 

8. The BBC interviewed US oceanographer Curtis Ebbesmeyer about the phenomenon.

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

9. He said: “The most profound lesson I’ve learned from the Lego story is that things that go to the bottom of the sea don’t always stay there.”

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

 

10. “The mystery is where they’ve ended up. After 17 years they’ve only been definitely reported off the coast of Cornwall.”

Tracey Williams / SWNS.com

He believes that since 1997, the pieces could have drifted up to 62,000 miles, which means they could wash up on any beach on earth.

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